Citation Analysis as a Tool for Collection Management and Development

Where: Room 1016, Kenneth C. Rowe Management Building

When: 9-10am, Monday, March 6th, 2017

The Information Management Public Lectures give attention to exciting advances in research and professional practice. The topics are diverse reflecting the importance and global extent of Information Management in today’s society. The lectures are open to all members of the Dalhousie campus and surrounding community. Click here for the full schedule. We encourage you to attend in person, but if that is not possible you can access a recording on our website following the lecture. Live streaming is not currently available.

Ken Field
Trent University

Abstract: This presentation will begin with a review of what has brought libraries to this point in serials acquisition history and how the current state of things affects serials collection management decisions. This will be followed by an overview of the current state of affairs in serials management at Trent University and a description of the use of citation analysis, along with other tools, in the aid of making better informed decisions about serials management.

Biography: Ken has worked at Trent University for the past 28 years occupying roles as a serials cataloguer, serials librarian, access services librarian, and is currently the head of Trent’s first branch library on its Durham Campus in Oshawa, Ontario, and the University’s Copyright Officer.  He obtained a BMusEd from Dalhousie in 1980, a Master of Library and Information Science from UBC in 1984, and a Graduate Professional Certificate in Library Sector Leadership from the University of Victoria in 2011.In addition to his work in the Library, he was Principal of Lady Eaton College, one of Trent’s five residential colleges, from 1996 to 2000, and was Acting Head of the Durham Campus in 2012/13.

During his sabbatical year, he will be undertaking a citation analysis of publications of Trent Humanities and Social Sciences faculty for a 2 or 3 year period in order to gain a better understanding of the types and sources of the resources that faculty have been using in their research. The goal is to provide the Library with a better sense of whether the resources it collects and makes accessible are meeting the research needs of the faculty. He will also continue to actively monitor developments in copyright, both nationally and internationally, and provide advice and guidance to the Trent University community on how any changes may effect the application of copyright law to community practices.

Setting the Sights on the Cities: Civilian Aerial Surveys in Canada during the Early 1920s

Where: Room 3089, Kenneth C. Rowe Management Building

When: Tuesday, February 7th, 2017 12:00-1:00pm

The Information Management Public Lectures give attention to exciting advances in research and professional practice. The topics are diverse reflecting the importance and global extent of Information Management in today’s society. The lectures are open to all members of the Dalhousie campus and surrounding community. Click here for the full schedule. We encourage you to attend in person, but if that is not possible you can access a recording on our website following the lecture. Live streaming is not currently available.

Dirk Werle
Ærde Environmental Research

Abstract: This talk will examine and illustrate the civilian development and practical results of aerial photography in Canada immediately after the First World War (1914-1918). The collections of vertical air photos and their assembly in mosaic form, as well as the institutional arrangements of their creation under the Canada Air Board until 1925, represent an important part of Canada’s remote sensing and mapping heritage. Re-purposing military aerial reconnaissance for civilian applications took similar pathways in the United States, the United Kingdom and France by focusing on urban settings. The study uses as primary evidence the actual air photos and digitally re-assembled photo mosaics of several Canadian cities to reveal nature and spatial extent of urban landscape features prevalent at the time. The study also explores relationships to the present-day situation and to previous mapping efforts in Halifax. Urban surveys carried out over Ottawa, Halifax, London, Calgary and Edmonton are highlighted. Annotated air photo mosaics are presented. It is argued that evolving format and detailed content of the largely experimental photography and mosaic compositions have retained significant scientific, heritage and educational value for comparative investigations involving more recent geospatial data and high-resolution satellite imagery of similar scale.

 Biography: Dirk Werle graduated from McGill University in 1984. He taught air photo interpretation and environmental remote sensing at several universities in Germany and Canada during the 1980s and early 1990s. Over the past three decades he has contributed as a researcher, lecturer and advisor to the Canadian RADARSAT and related Earth observation satellite programs, working on environmental monitoring and resource analysis issues. He served as president and officer of the Canadian Remote Sensing Society for several years; he is a senior member of the International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society and currently chairs the Board of the IOI-Canada Association of the International Oceans Institute, an NGO located in Halifax and in Malta. His current research interest is focussed on the technical evolution, institutional arrangements and practical adaptation of the modern “view from above.”

IM Public Lecture: “Learning in Digital Information Spaces: What is the Role of User Engagement?”

Lecture Details
Thursday, January 12, 2017
11:45am-12:45pm
Room 3089, Kenneth C. Rowe Management Building, 6100 University Avenue

The Information Management Public Lectures give attention to exciting advances in research and professional practice. The topics are diverse reflecting the importance and global extent of Information Management in today’s society. The lectures are open to all members of the Dalhousie campus and surrounding community. Click here for the full schedule. We encourage you to attend in person, but if that is not possible you can access a recording on our website following the lecture. Live streaming is not currently available. 

Heather O’Brien
University of British Columbia

Abstract: User engagement, a quality of user experience, is characterized by the depth of an actor’s cognitive, temporal and/or emotional investment in an interaction with a digital system. Recent emphasis on user engagement suggests that the need to engage people with and through technology has never been more paramount: failure to do so may result in lost revenue for e-commerce and search engine companies, and access to/engagement with technology may impact social relationships, civic engagement, health, learning, and so forth. Yet there is a lack of empirical evidence linking user engagement with such personal and societal outcomes in information interaction studies. Of particular interest in this research is the outcome of learning: information consumers continuously clarify information needs and goals; interpret, evaluate and analyze information; and incorporate new insights into their existing knowledge base. This talk will report on two studies in online news and reading environments that have examined the relationship between user engagement and learning.  These studies demonstrated the challenges with assessing learning in dynamic digital information spaces, the role that content and system characteristics play in fostering engagement and learning, and the need to critically probe the relationship between UE and learning in information interaction.

Biography: Heather O’Brien is an Associate Professor at the iSchool, University of British Columbia, where she teaches and researches in the area of human information interaction. Dr. O’Brien is best known for her work in the area of user engagement with technology, where she has contributed numerous publications, including two recent books, Why Engagement Matters: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives and Innovations on User Engagement with Digital Media (edited with Paul Cairns, 2016) and Measuring User Engagement (authored with Mounia Lalmas and Elad Yom-Tov, 2014), as well as the User Engagement Scale (UES), an experiential questionnaire that is used internationally to understand digitally mediated user experience. Her current research, supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Council of Canada and UBC’s Hampton Fund, is exploring the intersection of user characteristics (interest, cognitive load, affect, topical and technological expertise), tasks, and learning within exploratory search environments.

IM Public Lecture: “In the Readers’ Own Words: How User Content in the Catalogue Can Enhance Readers’ Advisory Services”

Lecture Details
Thursday, November 24th, 2016
5:35-6:35pm *embedded in the class INFO 5500: Information in Society
Room 1011, Kenneth C. Rowe Management Building, 6100 University Avenue

The Information Management Public Lectures give attention to exciting advances in research and professional practice. The topics are diverse reflecting the importance and global extent of Information Management in today’s society. The lectures are open to all members of the Dalhousie campus and surrounding community. Click here for the full schedule. We encourage you to attend in person, but if that is not possible you can access a recording on our website following the lecture. Live streaming is not currently available. 

Louise Spiteri
School of Information Management, Dalhousie University

Abstract: This session will discuss the findings of two studies conducted to explore user-generated content in public library catalogues, and its potential contribution to readers’ advisory (RA) services. The session will explore how user content, in the form of tags and reviews, provides a rich data set that connects to traditional RA access points. Further, the session will discuss the creation of three taxonomies for memory, emotion, and mood based on user content, and the use of these taxonomies to enhance discovery and the reading experience.

Biography: Dr. Louise Spiteri is Associate Professor in the School of Information Management, where she teaches courses in the areas of the organization of information, metadata, knowledge management, and records and information management. Dr. Spiteri’s research interests include social tagging, folksonomies, web-based discovery systems, and taxonomy design.

IM Public Lecture: “Comparing Field Data Collection with Commercial Datasets in Mapping Urban Areas”

Lecture Details
Thursday, November 3rd, 2016
5:35-6:35pm
Room 1011, Kenneth C. Rowe Management Building, 6100 University Avenue

The Information Management Public Lectures give attention to exciting advances in research and professional practice. The topics are diverse reflecting the importance and global extent of Information Management in today’s society. The lectures are open to all members of the Dalhousie campus and surrounding community. Click here for the full schedule. We encourage you to attend in person, but if that is not possible you can access a recording on the SIM website following the lecture. Live streaming is not currently available. 

Mathew Novak
Saint Mary’s University

Abstract: A wealth of data is needed to properly understand and manage the complexity of urban areas.  Using Halifax as a case study, this talk examines the benefits and issues of securing data on urban retailing from commercial providers or collecting the data through field work using smartphone technology. Attention is paid to smaller, independent stores since many commercial datasets may overlook these establishments. The talk concludes with a discussion of incorporating the data into a Geographic Information System (GIS) for use in managing and analysing the spatial component of the information.

Biography: Mathew Novak is an Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Geography and Environmental Studies at Saint Mary’s University.  His research focuses on the development of the urban landscape, using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to map processes and patterns of urban change.  Underlying his research is the understanding that the built environment is shaped by and simultaneously a shaper of human activity; the urban landscape can be read as an indicator of human culture and modified to influence activities of its inhabitants.    His current research is looking at changes to the inner-city landscape of Halifax, which is experiencing a rash of new condominium developments and reinvention of inner-city retail districts.