Brown Bag Lunch: Courtney Bayne, Records Analyst, Government of NS and Treasurer of ARMA NS

When: October 13, 2016 12 – 1 pm
Where: SIM Boardroom

Slides from presentation: click here

Ever thought of a career in Records Management? Where to take your education to make yourself a career? Have you ever thought about Records Management? We will talk about what it is and how it relates to your education. Courtney Bayne will speak about top trends, transferable skills sets, what employers are looking for, and answer any questions you may have about the industry.

About the speaker: Courtney Bayne, Records Analyst, Government of NS and Treasurer ARMA NS

* Records Analyst with the Nova Scotia Government.
* Worked in the RIM field with NS Government since 2006 (roughly 9 departments).
* Current department: Internal Services
* Library and Information Technology (honours) diploma from NSCC (2007)
* DAL MIM 2017 candidate.
* An active ARMA Member since 2007, current ARMA NS Treasure and have held various board positions over the years

IM Public Lecture: “Understanding the Complexity of Fisheries Information Use at the Science-Policy Interface”

Lecture Details
Thursday, October 6th, 2016
5:35-6:35pm *embedded in the class INFO 5500: Information in Society
Room 1011, Kenneth C. Rowe Management Building, 6100 University Avenue

The Information Management Public Lectures give attention to exciting advances in research and professional practice. The topics are diverse reflecting the importance and global extent of Information Management in today’s society. The lectures are open to all members of the Dalhousie campus and surrounding community. Click here for the full schedule. We encourage you to attend in person, but if that is not possible you can access a recording on our website following the lecture. Live streaming is not currently available.

Suzuette Soomai
School of Information Management, Dalhousie University

Abstract: The factors influencing scientific communication are contingent on the characteristics of the many dynamic and iterative science-policy interfaces among decision-makers, scientists, and other stakeholders as revealed in case studies of the Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO), and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). This talk presents the important drivers to information production and the key enablers and barriers to communication based on direct observations at the organizations’ meetings coupled with interviews of fisheries scientists and managers. Unique features of decision-making and information use enable the production of credible, relevant, and legitimate information in each organization, including trade-offs in these attributes to support fisheries governance objectives. Understanding the interface can equip the organizations to evaluate or modify practices to increase the uptake of their information in decision-making and enable stakeholders to determine their most appropriate entry point in a decision-making process.

Biography: Dr. Suzuette S. Soomai is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Environmental Information: Use and Influence (EIUI) research program at Dalhousie University. Her interdisciplinary research focuses on the role of scientific information—produced by fisheries management organizations— in policy- and decision-making for marine fisheries management. She holds an Interdisciplinary PhD and a Master in Marine Management (MMM) from Dalhousie University. She also holds a Master of Philosophy (MPhil) in Zoology and a BSc (Hons) from the University of the West Indies.

Dr. Soomai has considerable experience in fisheries resource assessment and management as she was a government fisheries scientist in Trinidad and Tobago. She has worked closely with commercial/large-scale and small-scale fishers in the Caribbean as well as regional an international fisheries management organizations in a range of research activities including fish stock assessments, freshwater aquaculture farming, and at-sea testing of marine bycatch reduction gear technologies.

Office 365 Workshop

Time: Thursday, September 29, 4-5:20
Location: 4th floor SIM lab
*Please bring your laptop!

A workshop on Office 365 products, organized by ITS & SIMSA.

* OneDrive gives you the ability save your files so you can access them anywhere you have network access. You are also able to share your files so you can all work on the same project.

* SharePoint gives you the ability to have document libraries and lists to share information with other people. It gives you the ability to share certain libraries or files with specific people at different permission levels.

* OneNote is a great way to organize your notes for different classes or projects. You can use different books that each can have labeled tabs to easily find what you are looking for.

* Forms gives you the options to create quizzes or surveys that you can give to friends and classmates. You can view the results in the browser to keep track of trends in the responses.

* Planner can be used to keep track of projects by creating the individual tasks and assigning them to different people in the group. You can see when tasks are due, and what needs to be done first to keep the progress going.

* Sway is a great tool to create webpages that can provide pictures, video and text. You can create multiple webpages and create a link so anyone can view your creations.

* Yammer gives you the ability to create groups and share information on the wall. It keeps the history so everyone can see what the new updates are. You can share videos, pictures and information.

* Delve provides a graphical way to view the popular updates and changes with people around you. It will show you what documents have recently been changed and what has been emailed to you.

You can use these documents in real time to see the changes immediately. This is especially helpful when you are collaborating on project and when doing team work.

Come learn skills that you can put on your resume!

IM Public Lecture: “Implementing Technology in Archives & Libraries”

Lecture Details
Wednesday, September 28th, 2016
3:30-5:00pm
University Hall, MacDonald Building, 6300 Coburg Road

The Information Management Public Lectures give attention to exciting advances in research and professional practice. The topics are diverse reflecting the importance and global extent of Information Management in today’s society. The lectures are open to all members of the Dalhousie campus and surrounding community. Click here for the full schedule. We encourage you to attend in person, but if that is not possible you can access a recording on our website following the lecture. Live streaming is not currently available. 

Presented in partnership with Dalhousie Libraries, as part of the Digital Preservation Management Workshop.

Evelyn McLellan
President, Artefactual Systems (BC)

Abstract: The last decade or so has seen an explosion in the number of software tools and services designed to assist archives and libraries to preserve digital content and make it available online. Some institutions have been drivers of this change; some have been gradually drawn in as funders and implementers; and some have lagged behind, as yet unable to take advantage of new technologies to achieve their mandates to acquire, preserve and present digital content. What are some of the barriers to implementing new technologies, and how have institutions successfully overcome these barriers? And how well do existing tools and services meet institutional needs anyway? This lecture will draw on the experiences of the presenter, who has spent the last eight years working with institutions as they have attempted (both successfully and unsuccessfully) to launch digital preservation programs.

Biography: Evelyn is responsible for directing Artefactual’s business operations and strategy. She also works as a senior systems analyst on Artefactual’s development and client projects. Evelyn is a graduate of the University of British Columbia’s Master of Archival Studies program (1997) and, prior to joining Artefactual, had over 10 years experience as an archivist and records manager at a number of organizations including the City of Vancouver Archives and the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia.  Evelyn has been with Artefactual since 2008, working as the first AtoM Community Product Manager, then as the Archivematica Product Manager, then assuming responsibility for managing Artefactual’s implementation and digital preservation strategy projects. In September 2013 she took on the role of President when Peter Van Garderen stepped aside to work full-time on archives systems research.

IM Public Lecture: “Complex Innovation and the Patent System”

Lecture Details
Thursday, September 22nd, 2016
5:35-6:35pm *embedded in the class INFO 5500: Information in Society
Room 1011, Kenneth C. Rowe Management Building, 6100 University Avenue

The Information Management Public Lectures give attention to exciting advances in research and professional practice. The topics are diverse reflecting the importance and global extent of Information Management in today’s society. The lectures are open to all members of the Dalhousie campus and surrounding community. When feasible, recordings of the lectures are posted here for wider circulation. For the full schedule, visit the Public Lecture page of our website here.

NOTE: We encourage you to attend in person, but if that is not possible you can access an audio recording + slides on our website following the lecture (a notice will be sent when posted). Live streaming is not currently available.

“Complex Innovation and the Patent System”

Ryan Whalen

School of Information Management, Dalhousie University

Abstract: As the universe of available information becomes larger and innovation becomes more complex, the task of examining patent applications becomes increasingly difficult. This project demonstrates that the United States Patent Office has insufficiently responded to changes in the information universe and to innovation norms, leaving the Patent Office less able to adequately assess patent applications, and more likely to grant bad patents. 

After first demonstrating how innovation has been responsive to contemporary innovation norms for hundreds of years, this project uses information and data science methods to empirically demonstrate how innovation has drastically changed in recent decades. After empirically demonstrating the changed innovation system and the inadequate response to these changes by the Patent Office, this presentation concludes with policy prescriptions aimed to help the Patent Office implement examination procedures adequate to assess 21stcentury innovation. These prescriptions include more granular crediting for the time spent by examiners assessing applications, an increased focus on teamwork at the Patent Office, improvements to the inter partes review process, and alterations to the analogous art doctrine.

Biography: Ryan Whalen is a faculty member of Dalhousie University’s School of Information Management. His research focuses on innovation policy, intellectual property law, and computational social science. He holds a JD from Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law, and a PhD in Media, Technology, and Society from Northwestern University.

Association Display: Slides

We know that yesterday’s Association Display was overwhelming (so many associations!) so we’re here to make it a little easier for you. Here is the slideshow presentation: Association Display Presentation

Both APLA and ARMA graciously left us some swag material, which can be found on the table in the SIM common room. If you didn’t get a chance to join either association yesterday, you can join online:

  • APLA is free for students to join. You can sign-up here.
  • ARMA has a lower fee than usual for students. You can sign-up here.