IM Public Lecture Series: Bridging the Gap: The Communication of Information in Complex, Multi-sectoral Networks – Recording Available!

*****Edit: Recording of this lecture is available here!*****
Presented by: Lee Wilson (Dalhousie University)

Abstract:
Research has shown that the development of strong communication and information-sharing networks is essential to the success of natural resource developments, particularly those taking place in highly active, and often hotly contested, coastal areas. In the Bay of Fundy region, tidal power offers a source of clean, renewable energy, as well as a means to strengthen local economies. The implementation of tidal power affects many stakeholders, e.g., municipal, provincial, and federal government agencies; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); environmental groups; industry both domestic and foreign; universities; and community groups, including First Nations communities. This lecture will present the results of a mixed-methods case study that used Social Network Analysis (SNA) and semi-structured interviews to examine tidal power stakeholder communication networks operating in the Bay of Fundy region of Nova Scotia. Understanding how, and indeed if, stakeholder organizations are communicating yields insights into how communication channels may be improved, which can also be applied to similar contexts, e.g., the offshore wind and wave energy industries. Among the many findings emerging from this research, the importance of “bridger” organizations, particularly from the NGO sector, in facilitating the flow and use of information among diverse organizations is highlighted.

Time:
Monday January 25, 2016 – 01:00 - 02:00 PM

Location:
Rowe 3001 (embedded into the class INFO 6100: Information in Public Policy and Decision Making)

IM Public Lecture Series: “Fraud Forgotten? What the History of Drug Regulation Teaches Us About the Importance of Transparency Today” by Matthew Herder

Abstract:

Greater transparency is needed in the realm of pharmaceutical drugs. The current policy focus is on disclosing more information about the safety and effectiveness of drugs. But to be effective, transparency must serve another purpose – namely, of enabling standard setting through a more participatory, public model of drug regulation. I turn to the history of Canadian drug regulation to demonstrate that such a conception of transparency is not only possible, but increasingly needed. I argue that tying transparency to a revitalized concept of fraud in drug research and development might help activate more participatory, public regulatory work.

Biography:

Matthew Herder is an associate professor in the Faculties of Medicine and Law at Dalhousie University. He holds three law degrees from Dalhousie and Stanford University’s Law School. His research centres around biomedical innovation policy, with a particular focus on intellectual property law and practices connected to the commercialization of scientific research. He is currently the Principal Investigator on a three year CIHR operating grant. He has been commissioned to write reports and appear as an expert witness before key national and international institutions, including the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development and, most recently, two Canadian Parliamentary committees, which contributed to the most important changes to Canada’s Food and Drugs Act since the thalidomide disaster of the 1960s.

The Information Management Public Lectures give attention to exciting advances in research and professional practice. The topics are diverse reflecting the importance and global extent of Information Management in today’s society. The lectures are open to all members of the Dalhousie campus and surrounding community. When feasible, recordings of the lectures are posted here for wider circulation. For the full schedule, visit the Public Lecture page of the SIM website.

Lecture Details
Wednesday, November 4th, 2015 from 12:00-1:00pm
Room 3089, Kenneth C. Rowe Management Building, 6100 University Avenue

IM Public Lecture Series: “Mindtools: What Does it Mean to be Literate in the Age of Google?” by Dan Russell

Dan Russell
Google Inc.

Abstract: What does it mean to be literate at a time when you can search billions of texts in less than 300 milliseconds? Although you might think that “literacy” is one of the great constants that transcends the ages, the skills of a literate person have changed substantially over time as texts and technology allow for new kinds of reading and understanding. Knowing how to read is just the beginning of it — knowing how to frame a question, pose a query, how to interpret the texts you find, how to organize and use the information you discover, how to understand your metacognition — these are all critical parts of being literate as well. In this talk Russell will review what literacy is today, in the age of Google, and show how some very surprising and unexpected skills will turn out to be critical in the years ahead.  We have created powerful new tools for the mind. Thing is, those tools are constantly evolving and changing even as the things they operate on change as well. This puts us in the position of having to learn how to find tools, and understanding the substrate on which they work. Literacy in these days is not just reading and writing, but also understanding what knowledge tools are available, and how they can be used in interesting new ways.  And the role of the designer turns out to be critical in this new understanding of literacy

Biography: Daniel Russell is the Űber Tech Lead for Search Quality and User Happiness in Mountain View.  He earned his PhD in computer science, specializing in Artificial Intelligence until he realized that amplifying human intelligence was his real passion.  His day job is researching how people search and the ways they come to learn about the world through Google.  His 20% job is teaching the world to search more effectively.  Dan enjoys teaching, learning, running and music, preferably all in one day. Dan blogs at SearchReSearch (http://searchresearch1.blogspot.com), teaches search skills classes online at PowerSearchingWithGoogle.com, and teaches live search/research classes live throughout the civilized world.

Lecture Details
Wednesday, October 21st, 2015 from 5:30pm-6:30pm
Room 3089, Kenneth C. Rowe Management Building, 6100 University Avenue

IM Public Lecture: “iMarine in Support of FAO’s Blue Growth Initiative: The Information Requirements*” by Marc Taconet


Abstract:
In order to address the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set by the UN, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) has recently launched its Blue Growth initiative. A key challenge for the promotion of Blue Growth is the need for facts-based decision making across multiple scientific disciplines, a challenge which a data infrastructure such as iMarine can help articulating. iMarine aims at developing collaborative science, and the platform has demonstrated a strong potential to deliver cost-efficient solutions by pooling together data, software, methodologies and expertise. Beyond the technological demonstration, its uptake however requires the development of a comprehensive sustainability plan, including governance, data policies, marketing, outreach, and capacity building (www.i-marine.eu/Pages/Home.aspx).

Biography:
Marc Taconet is the Chief of the Statistics and Information Branch, FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department, and Secretary of the FIRMS partnership. A member of the FAO Rome-based staff since 1987, Mr. Taconet has led the development of the Fisheries Global Information System (FIGIS), played a leading user-community role in several European Union-funded projects, and chaired the iMarine board.

Lecture Details:
Thursday, October 8th, 2015 from 4:30-6:30pm
University Hall, MacDonald Building, 6300 Coburg Road (across from the University Club, Studley Campus)

Reception to follow the lecture – co-sponsored by the Dalhousie President’s Office, Dalhousie Libraries, and the Dalhousie Faculty of Agriculture (5:30-6:30pm).

IM Public Lecture: “Exploring Space and Place with Mobile Applications” by Keith Lawson


Abstract:
A new interest in space and place has encouraged museums and archives to find ways to use mobile devices to create connections between items in their collections and the locations associated with these items beyond the walls of their institutions, giving visitors a new access and opportunities to create new experiences. This paper brings together ideas from Michael de Certeau, tourism studies, game studies, and mobile interface theory to examine how digital objects-texts (images, audio and video) presented through mobile devices create an experience of place. This experience may be of a single place or of multiple places joined in a larger narrative space.

Biography:
Keith Lawson is an Assistant Professor in the School of Information Management at Dalhousie University. His teaching focuses on communications and technology, including a course on Web Design and Architecture – which has a Digital Humanities component. He has worked on the Elizabeth Barrett Browning Archive and on projects with Dalhousie University Digital Archives and Special Collections. Since work on Thomas De Quincey as a graduate student, Keith has been interested in imaginative responses to urban life. His current research focuses on the use of mobile applications by institutions of cultural memory to connect visitors and tourists to objects, places, and events.
Thank you.

Time:
5:35 pm – 6:35 pm, September 28th, 2015 (Tonight!!)

Location:
Room 1020, Kenneth C. Rowe Management Building, 6100 University Avenue

The Information Management Public Lectures give attention to exciting advances in research and professional practice. The topics are diverse reflecting the importance and global extent of Information Management in today’s society. The lectures are open to all members of the Dalhousie campus and surrounding community. When feasible, recordings of the lectures are posted here for wider circulation. For the full schedule, visit the Public Lecture page of SIM’s website.